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А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
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1. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter I. Night
Входимость: 101. Размер: 116кб.
2. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VI. Pyotr Stepanovitch is busy
Входимость: 77. Размер: 105кб.
3. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter V. The subtle serpent
Входимость: 75. Размер: 113кб.
4. Dostoevsky. Poor Folk (English. Бедные люди). Page 4
Входимость: 68. Размер: 47кб.
5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter II. Prince harry. Matchmaking
Входимость: 58. Размер: 96кб.
6. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter VI
Входимость: 56. Размер: 60кб.
7. Dostoevsky. Poor Folk (English. Бедные люди)
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8. Dostoevsky. Poor Folk (English. Бедные люди). Page 3
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9. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter II. Night (continued)
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10. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Сhapter III. A romance ended
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11. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part six. Chapter Two
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12. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part II. Chapter III
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13. Dostoevsky. Poor Folk (English. Бедные люди). Page 6
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14. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part III. Chapter X
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15. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XI. Ivan. Chapter 9.The Devil. Ivan"s Nightmare
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16. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part four. Chapter Two
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17. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part II. Chapter IX
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18. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part II. Chapter IV
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19. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter III. The sins of others
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20. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part two. Chapter Three
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21. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter VII
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22. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part I. Book II. An Unfortunate Gathering. Chapter 7. A Young Man Bent on a Career
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23. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter V. A wanderer
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24. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter X. Filibusters. A fatal morning
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25. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part II. Chapter VIII
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26. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter IX
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27. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter VI. A busy night
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28. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter VIII
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29. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part four. Chapter Five
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30. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part I. Chapter XVI
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31. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VII. A meeting
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32. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part II. Book VI. The Russian Monk. Chapter 3. Conversations and Exhortations of Father Zossima
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33. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part I. Chapter III
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34. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter V. On the eve op the fete
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35. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part III. Chapter II
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36. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part five. Chapter Three
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37. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part II. Chapter III
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38. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter IV. The cripple
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39. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter IV. The last resolution
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40. Dostoevsky. Poor Folk (English. Бедные люди). Page 5
Входимость: 33. Размер: 59кб.
41. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part I. Book II. An Unfortunate Gathering. Chapter 6. Why Is Such a Man Alive?
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42. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part II. Chapter V
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43. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter XII
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44. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part III. Book IX. The Preliminary Investigation. Chapter 7.Mitya"s Great Secret Received with Hisses
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45. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part III. Book IX. The Preliminary Investigation. Chapter 5.The Third Ordeal
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46. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter II
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47. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part three. Chapter Five
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48. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part one. Chapter Three
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49. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XI. Ivan. Chapter 8. The Third and Last Interview with Smerdyakov
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50. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part four. Chapter One
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1. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter I. Night
Входимость: 101. Размер: 116кб.
Часть текста: on that Sunday. But what we wondered was, through whom the story had got about so quickly and so accurately. Not one of the persons present had any need to give away the secret of what had happened, or interest to serve by doing so. The servants had not been present. Lebyadkinwas the only one who might have chattered, not so much from spite, for he had gone out in great alarm (and fear of an enemy destroys spite against him), but simply from incontinence of speech-But Lebyadkin and his sister had disappeared next day, and nothing could be heard of them. There was no trace of them at Filipov's house, they had moved, no one knew where, and seemed to have vanished. Shatov, of whom I wanted to inquire about Marya Timofyevna, would not open his door, and I believe sat locked up in his room for the whole of those eight days, even discontinuing his work in the town. He would not see me. I went to see him on Tuesday and knocked at his door. I got no answer, but being convinced by unmistakable evidence that he was at home, I knocked a second time. Then, jumping up, apparently from his bed, he strode to the door and shouted at the top of his voice: “Shatov is not at home!” With that I went away. Stepan Trofimovitch and I, not without dismay at the boldness of the supposition, though we tried to encourage one another, reached at last a conclusion: we made up our mind that the only person who could be responsible for spreading these rumours was Pyotr Stepanovitch, though he himself not long after assured his father that he had found the story on every one's lips, especially at the club, and that the governor and his wife were familiar with every detail of it. What is even more remarkable is that the next day, Monday evening, I met Liputin, and he knew every word that had been passed, so that he must have heard it first-hand. Many of the ladies (and some of the leading ones) were very inquisitive about the...
2. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VI. Pyotr Stepanovitch is busy
Входимость: 77. Размер: 105кб.
Часть текста: Our mild governor had left the affairs of the province a little out of gear; at the moment we were threatened with cholera; serious outbreaks of cattle plague had appeared in several places; fires were prevalent that summer in towns and villages; whilst among the peasantry foolish rumours of incendiarism grew stronger and stronger. Cases of robbery were twice as numerous as usual. But all this, of course, would have been perfectly ordinary had there been no other and more weighty reasons to disturb the equanimity of Audrey Antonovitch, who had till then been in good spirits. What struck Yulia Mihailovna most of all was that he became more silent and, strange to say, more secretive every day. Yet it was hard to imagine what he had to hide. It is true that he rarely opposed her and as a rule followed her lead without question. At her instigation, for instance, two or three regulations of a risky and hardly legal character were introduced with the object of strengthening the authority of the governor. There were several ominous instances of transgressions being condoned with the same end in view; persons who deserved to be sent to prison and Siberia were, solely because she insisted, recommended for promotion. Certain complaints and inquiries were deliberately and systematically ignored. All this came out later on. Not only did Lembke sign everything, but he did not even go into the question of the share taken by his wife in the execution of his duties. On the other hand, he began at times to be restive about “the most trifling matters,” to the surprise of Yulia Mihailovna. No doubt he felt...
3. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter V. The subtle serpent
Входимость: 75. Размер: 113кб.
Часть текста: can see at once that it's the highest society,” cried Marya Timofyevna, clapping her hands, ecstatically preparing herself to listen to a conversation in French. Varvara Petrovna stared at her almost in dismay. We all sat in silence, waiting to see how it would end. Shatov did not lift up his head, and Stepan Trofimovitch was overwhelmed with confusion as though it were all his fault; the perspiration stood out on his temples. I glanced at Liza (she was sitting in the corner almost beside Shatov). Her eyes darted keenly from Varvara Petrovna to the cripple and back again; her lips were drawn into a smile, but not a pleasant one. Varvara Petrovna saw that smile. Meanwhile Marya Timofyevna was absolutely transported. With evident enjoyment and without a trace of embarrassment she stared at Varvara Petrovna's beautiful drawing-room—the furniture, the carpets, the pictures on the walls, the old-fashioned painted ceiling, the great bronze crucifix in the corner, the china lamp, the albums, the objects on the table. “And you're here, too, Shatushka!” she cried suddenly. “Only fancy, I saw you a long time ago, but I thought it couldn't be you! How could you come here!” And she laughed gaily. “You know this woman?” said Varvara Petrovna, turning to him at once. “I know her,” muttered Shatov. He seemed about to move from his chair, but remained sitting. “What do you know of her? Make haste, please!” “Oh, well. . .” he stammered with an incongruous smile. “You see for yourself. ...” “What do I see? Come now, say something!” “She lives in the same house as I do. . . with her brother. . . an officer.” “Well?” Shatov stammered again. “It's not worth talking about. . .” he muttered, and relapsed into determined silence. He positively flushed with determination. “Of...
4. Dostoevsky. Poor Folk (English. Бедные люди). Page 4
Входимость: 68. Размер: 47кб.
Часть текста: much for yesterday! Yes, dearest, we have both been caught playing the fool, for I have become thoroughly bitten with the actress of whom I spoke. Last night I listened to her with all my ears, although, strangely enough, it was practically my first sight of her, seeing that only once before had I been to the theatre. In those days I lived cheek by jowl with a party of five young men--a most noisy crew- and one night I accompanied them, willy-nilly, to the theatre, though I held myself decently aloof from their doings, and only assisted them for company's sake. How those fellows talked to me of this actress! Every night when the theatre was open, the entire band of them (they always seemed to possess the requisite money) would betake themselves to that place of entertainment, where they ascended to the gallery, and clapped their hands, and repeatedly recalled the actress in question. In fact, they went simply mad over her. Even after we had returned home they would give me no rest, but would go on talking about her all night, and calling her their Glasha, and declaring themselves to be in love with "the canary-bird of their hearts." My defenseless self, too, they would plague about the woman, for I was as young as they. What a figure I must have cut with them on the fourth tier of the gallery! Yet, I never got a sight of more than just a corner of the curtain, but had to content myself with listening. She had a fine, resounding, mellow voice like a nightingale's, and we all of us used to clap our hands loudly, and to shout at the top of our lungs. In short, we came very near to being ejected. On the first occasion I went home walking as in a mist, with a single rouble left in my pocket, and an interval of ten clear days confronting me before next pay-day. Yet, what think you, dearest? The very next day, before going to work, I called at a French perfumer's, and spent my whole remaining capital on some eau-de- Cologne...
5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter II. Prince harry. Matchmaking
Входимость: 58. Размер: 96кб.
Часть текста: fact that he was a child himself. I was not there in those days, and he continually felt the want of a real friend. He did not hesitate to make a friend of this little creature as soon as he had grown a little older. It somehow came to pass quite naturally that there seemed to be no discrepancy of age between them. More than once he awaked his ten- or eleven-year-old friend at night, simply to pour out his wounded feelings and weep before him, or to tell him some family secret, without realising that this was an outrageous proceeding. They threw themselves into each other's arms and wept. The boy knew that his mother loved him very much, but I doubt whether he cared much for her. She talked little to him and did not often interfere with him, but he was always morbidly conscious of her intent, searching eyes fixed upon him. Yet the mother confided his whole instruction and moral education to Stepan Trofimovitch. At that time her faith in him was unshaken. One can't help believing that the tutor had rather a bad influence on his pupil's nerves. When at sixteen he was taken to a lyceum he was fragile-looking and pale, strangely quiet and dreamy. (Later on he was distinguished by great physical strength.) One must assume too that the friends went on weeping at night, throwing themselves in each other's arms, though their tears were not always due to domestic difficulties. Stepan Trofimovitch succeeded in reaching the...

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