• Наши партнеры
    Super-elki.ru - датские елки в кадках с доставкой
  • Cлова на букву "A"


    А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
    0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
    Поиск  

    Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 1189).
    Чтобы посмотреть все варианты, нажмите

     Кол-во Слово
    154ABLE
    1513ABOUT
    156ABOVE
    193ABROAD
    148ABSOLUTELY
    236ABUELA
    180ACCOUNT
    228ACUERDO
    194ACUSADO
    330ADD
    183ADDRESS
    306ADEMAS
    143ADMIT
    176AFFAIR
    386AFRAID
    722AFTER
    315AFTERWARD
    969AGAIN
    278AGAINST
    487AGLAYA
    243AGO
    150AHI
    717AHORA
    242AIR
    144AIRE
    176ALARM
    147ALEGRIA
    174ALEJANDROVNA
    241ALEXANDROVNA
    185ALEXEI
    233ALEXEY
    428ALGO
    166ALGUN
    211ALGUNA
    150ALGUNOS
    1054ALIOCHA
    3582ALL
    364ALLA
    377ALLI
    208ALLOW
    212ALMA
    575ALMOST
    327ALONE
    197ALONG
    151ALPHONSINE
    327ALREADY
    363ALSO
    144ALTHOUGH
    205ALTRO
    630ALWAY
    1349ALYOSHA
    354AMIGO
    265AMONG
    246AMOR
    232ANA
    154ANADIO
    437ANCHE
    218ANCORA
    196ANDRE
    219ANDREIEVNA
    359ANDREY
    353ANDREYEVNA
    154ANGEL
    259ANGRY
    407ANNA
    394ANOS
    512ANOTHER
    306ANSWER
    311ANSWERED
    198ANT
    644ANTE
    177ANTONOVITCH
    144ANXIOUS
    605ANY
    272ANYONE
    501ANYTHING
    174ANYWAY
    180APENAS
    236APPEAR
    559AQUEL
    425AQUELLA
    257AQUELLO
    176AQUELLOS
    654AQUI
    2236ARE
    242ARM
    209ASHAMED
    635ASI
    415ASK
    524ASKED
    160ASLEEP
    156ASSURE
    298ASTLEY
    238ASUNTO
    148ATENCION
    261AUN
    408AUNQUE
    297AVEVA
    741AWAY
    254AYER

    Несколько случайно найденных страниц

    по слову ANYHOW

    1. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter VI. A busy night
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 76кб.
    Часть текста: that Shatov would certainly not give information, because his wife had come back and given birth to a child, and no one “who knew anything of human nature “could suppose that Shatov could be a danger at this moment. But to his discomfiture he found none of them at home except Erkel and Lyamshin. Erkel listened in silence, looking candidly into his eyes, and in answer to the direct question “Would he go at six o'clock or not?” he replied with the brightest of smiles that “of course he would go.” Lyamshin was in bed, seriously ill, as it seemed, with his head covered with a quilt. He was alarmed at Virginsky's coming in, and as soon as the latter began speaking he waved him off from under the bedclothes, entreating him to let him alone. He listened to all he said about Shatov, however, and seemed for some reason extremely struck by the news that Virginsky had found no one at home. It seemed that Lyamshin knew already (through Liputin) of Fedka's death, and hurriedly and incoherently told Virginsky about it, at which the latter seemed struck in his turn. To Virginsky's direct question, “Should they go or not?” he began suddenly waving his hands again, entreating him to let him alone, and saying that it was not his business, and that he knew nothing about it. Virginsky returned home dejected and greatly alarmed. It weighed upon him that he had to hide it from his family; he was accustomed to tell his wife everything; and if his feverish brain had not hatched a new idea at that moment, a new plan of conciliation for further action, he might have taken to his bed like Lyamshin. But this new idea sustained him; what's more, he began impatiently awaiting the hour fixed, and set off for the appointed spot earlier than was necessary. It was a very gloomy place at the end of the huge park. I went there afterwards on purpose to look...
    2. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter V. A wanderer
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 76кб.
    Часть текста: I have already mentioned that that morning I met him in passing; he seemed to me not himself. He told me among other things that on the evening before at nine o'clock (that is, three hours before the fire had broken out) he had been at Marya Timofyevna's. He went in the morning to look at the corpses, but as far as I know gave no evidence of any sort that morning. Meanwhile, towards the end of the day there was a perfect tempest in his soul, and. . . I think I can say with certainty that there was a moment at dusk when he wanted to get up, go out and tell everything. What that everything was, no one but he could say. Of course he would have achieved nothing, and would have simply betrayed himself. He had no proofs whatever with which to convict the perpetrators of the crime, and, indeed, he had nothing but vague conjectures to go upon, though to him they amounted to complete certainty. But he was ready to ruin himself if he could only “crush the scoundrels”—his own words. Pyotr Stepanovitch had guessed fairly correctly at this impulse in him, and he knew himself that he was risking a great deal in putting off the execution of his new awful project till next day. On his side there ...
    3. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part I. Chapter II
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 25кб.
    Часть текста: had made himself indispensable in several quarters, amongst others in his department of the government; and yet it was a known fact that Fedor Ivanovitch Epanchin was a man of no education whatever, and had absolutely risen from the ranks. This last fact could, of course, reflect nothing but credit upon the general; and yet, though unquestionably a sagacious man, he had his own little weaknesses-very excusable ones,--one of which was a dislike to any allusion to the above circumstance. He was undoubtedly clever. For instance, he made a point of never asserting himself when he would gain more by keeping in the background; and in consequence many exalted personages valued him principally for his humility and simplicity, and because "he knew his place." And yet if these good people could only have had a peep into the mind of this excellent fellow who "knew his place" so well! The fact is that, in spite of his knowledge of the world and his really remarkable abilities, he always liked to appear to be carrying out other people's ideas rather than his own. And also, his luck seldom failed him, even at cards, for which he had a passion that he did not attempt to conceal. He played for high stakes, and moved, altogether, in very varied society. As to age, General Epanchin was in the very prime of life; that is, about fifty-five years of age,--the flowering time of existence, when real enjoyment of life begins. His healthy appearance, good colour, sound, though discoloured teeth, sturdy figure, preoccupied air during business hours, and jolly good...
    4. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part III. Book VIII. Mitya. Chapter 6."I Am Coming, Too!"
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 20кб.
    Часть текста: Alyosha fell on the earth, and rapturously swore to love it for ever and ever. All was confusion, confusion in Mitya's soul, but although many things were goading his heart, at that moment his whole being was yearning for her, his queen, to whom he was flying to look on her for the last time. One thing I can say for certain; his heart did not waver for one instant. I shall perhaps not be believed when I say that this jealous lover felt not the slightest jealousy of this new rival, who seemed to have sprung out of the earth. If any other had appeared on the scene, he would have been jealous at once, and would-perhaps have stained his fierce hands with blood again. But as he flew through the night, he felt no envy, no hostility even, for the man who had been her first lover.... It is true he had not yet seen him. "Here there was no room for dispute: it was her right and his; this was her first love which, after five years, she had not forgotten; so she had loved him only for those five years, and I, how do I come in? What right have I? Step aside, Mitya, and make way! What am I now? Now everything is over apart from the officer even if he had not appeared, everything would be over..." These words would roughly have expressed his feelings, if he had been capable of reasoning. But he could not reason at that moment. His present plan of action had arisen without...
    5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter II. Prince harry. Matchmaking
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 96кб.
    Часть текста: between them. More than once he awaked his ten- or eleven-year-old friend at night, simply to pour out his wounded feelings and weep before him, or to tell him some family secret, without realising that this was an outrageous proceeding. They threw themselves into each other's arms and wept. The boy knew that his mother loved him very much, but I doubt whether he cared much for her. She talked little to him and did not often interfere with him, but he was always morbidly conscious of her intent, searching eyes fixed upon him. Yet the mother confided his whole instruction and moral education to Stepan Trofimovitch. At that time her faith in him was unshaken. One can't help believing that the tutor had rather a bad influence on his pupil's nerves. When at sixteen he was taken to a lyceum he was fragile-looking and pale, strangely quiet and dreamy. (Later on he was distinguished by great physical strength.) One must assume too that the friends went on weeping at night, throwing themselves in each other's arms, though their tears were not always due to domestic difficulties. Stepan Trofimovitch succeeded in reaching the deepest chords in his pupil's heart, and had aroused in him a vague sensation of that eternal, sacred yearning which some elect souls can never give up for cheap gratification when once they have tasted and known it. (There are some connoisseurs who prize this yearning more than the most complete satisfaction of it, if such were possible.) But in any case it was just as well that the pupil and the preceptor were, though none too soon, parted. For the first two years the lad used to come home from the lyceum for the holidays. While Varvara Petrovna and Stepan Trofimovitch were staying in Petersburg he was sometimes present at the literary evenings at his...

    © 2000- NIV