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127BABY
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154BAD
87BAG
99BAJA
180BAJO
105BALL
82BANCO
89BANK
111BARBARA
216BARON
87BASE
150BASTA
176BASTANTE
130BEAR
102BEAT
88BEATING
101BEAUTIFUL
126BEAUTY
79BEBER
181BECAME
601BECAUSE
253BECOME
320BED
1812BEEN
1041BEFORE
111BEFOREHAND
176BEG
667BEGAN
89BEGGAR
90BEGGED
80BEGGING
238BEGIN
176BEGINNING
143BEGUN
209BEHIND
427BEING
642BELIEVE
121BELIEVED
101BELL
78BELONG
81BELOVED
82BENCH
169BENE
92BENT
140BERLIN
331BESIDE
161BEST
93BETRAY
419BETTER
185BETWEEN
106BEYOND
947BIEN
103BIG
141BILLETES
85BIRD
141BIT
139BLACK
157BLAME
523BLANCHE
208BLOOD
112BLOW
79BLUE
96BLUSH
95BOCA
89BODY
118BOLSILLO
327BOOK
100BOOT
294BOTH
98BOTTLE
90BOUGHT
146BOUND
86BOW
94BOWED
96BOX
552BOY
121BRAIN
123BRAZOS
141BREAD
101BREAK
85BREAST
105BREATH
87BRIDGE
230BRING
145BROKE
114BROKEN
531BROTHER
341BROUGHT
150BUEN
184BUENA
237BUENO
79BUR
98BURDOVSKY
84BURNING
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252BUSINESS
4742BUT
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1. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part IV. Chapter II
Входимость: 1. Размер: 17кб.
Часть текста: I did not guess and was still puzzled she would smile gently, as it were, to herself, and would suddenly hold out to me her hot little hand, with its thin, wasted little fingers. Now it is all over, and everything is understood, but to this day I do not know the secrets of that sick, tortured and outraged little heart. I feel that I am digressing, but at this moment I want to think only of Nellie. Strange to say, now that I am lying alone on a hospital bed, abandoned by all whom I loved so fondly and intensely, some trivial incident of that past, often unnoticed at the time and soon forgotten, comes back all at once to my mind and suddenly takes quite a new significance, completing and explaining to me what I had failed to understand till now. For the first four days of her illness, we, the doctor and I, were in great alarm about her, but on the fifth day the doctor took me aside and told me that there was no reason for anxiety and she would certainly recover. This doctor was the one I had known so long, a good-natured and eccentric old bachelor whom I had called in in Nellie's first illness, and who had so impressed her by the huge Stanislav Cross on his breast. "So there's no reason for anxiety," I said, greatly relieved. "No, she'll get well this time, but afterwards she will soon die." "Die! But why?" I cried, overwhelmed at this death sentence. "Yes, she is certain to die very soon. The patient has an organic defect of the heart, and at the slightest unfavourable circumstance she'll be laid up again. She will perhaps get better, but then she'll be ill again and at last she'll die." "Do you mean nothing can be done to save her? Surely that's impossible. " "But it's inevitable. However, with the removal of un- favourable circumstances, with a quiet and easy life with more pleasure in it, the patient might yet be kept from death and there even are cases. . . unexpected. . . strange...
2. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part three. Chapter Three
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: little and reluctantly, as though performing a duty, and there was a restlessness in his movements. He only wanted a sling on his arm or a bandage on his finger to complete the impression of a man with a painful abscess or a broken arm. The pale, sombre face lighted up for a moment when his mother and sister entered, but this only gave it a look of more intense suffering, in place of its listless dejection. The light soon died away, but the look of suffering remained, and Zossimov, watching and studying his patient with all the zest of a young doctor beginning to practise, noticed in him no joy at the arrival of his mother and sister, but a sort of bitter, hidden determination to bear another hour or two of inevitable torture. He saw later that almost every word of the following conversation seemed to touch on some sore place and irritate it. But at the same time he marvelled at the power of controlling himself and hiding his feelings in a patient who the previous day had, like a monomaniac, fallen into a frenzy at the slightest word. "Yes, I see myself now that I am almost well," said Raskolnikov, giving his mother and sister a kiss of welcome which made Pulcheria Alexandrovna radiant at once. "And I don't say this as I did yesterday," he said addressing Razumihin, with a friendly pressure of his hand. "Yes, indeed, I am quite surprised at him to-day," began Zossimov, much delighted at the ladies' entrance, for he had not succeeded in keeping up a conversation with his patient for ten minutes. "In another three or four days, if he goes on like this, he will be just as before, that is, as he was a month ago, or two... or perhaps even three. This has been...
3. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part III. Book VIII. Mitya. Chapter 4.In the Dark
Входимость: 2. Размер: 15кб.
Часть текста: was no need to go there... not the slightest need... he must raise no alarm... they would run and tell directly.... Marya Kondratyevna was clearly in the plot, Smerdyakov too, he too, all had been bought over!" He formed another plan of action: he ran a long way round Fyodor Pavlovitch's house, crossing the lane, running down Dmitrovsky Street, then over the little bridge, and so came straight to the deserted alley at the back, which was empty and uninhabited, with, on one side the hurdle fence of a neighbour's kitchen-garden, on the other the strong high fence that ran all round Fyodor Pavlovitch's garden. Here he chose a spot, apparently the very place, where according to the tradition, he knew Lizaveta had once climbed over it: "If she could climb over it," the thought, God knows why, occurred to him, "surely I can." He did in fact jump up, and instantly contrived to catch hold of the top of the fence. Then he vigorously pulled himself up and sat astride on it. Close by, in the garden stood the bathhouse, but from the fence he could see the lighted windows of the house too. "Yes, the old man's bedroom is lighted up. She's there! and he leapt from the fence into the garden. Though he knew Grigory was ill and very likely Smerdyakov, too, and that there was no one to hear him, he instinctively hid himself, stood still, and began to listen. But there was dead silence on all sides and, as...
4. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part I. Book III. The Sensualists. Chapter 9. The Sensualists
Входимость: 1. Размер: 14кб.
Часть текста: to speak, with the last drop of his blood. Seeing this, Dmitri uttered a scream rather than a shout and rushed at Grigory. "Then she's there! She's hidden there! Out of the way, scoundrel!" He tried to pull Grigory away, but the old servant pushed him back. Beside himself with fury, Dmitri struck out, and hit Grigory with all his might. The old man fell like a log, and Dmitri, leaping over him, broke in the door. Smerdyakov remained pale and trembling at the other end of the room, huddling close to Fyodor Pavlovitch. "She's here!" shouted Dmitri. "I saw her turn towards the house just now, but I couldn't catch her. Where is she? Where is she?" That shout, "She's here!" produced an indescribable effect on Fyodor Pavlovitch. All his terror left him. "Hold him! Hold him!" he cried, and dashed after Dmitri. Meanwhile Grigory had got up from the floor, but still seemed stunned. Ivan and Alyosha ran after their father. In the third room something was heard to fall on the floor with a ringing crash: it was a large glass vase -- not an expensive one -- on a marble pedestal which Dmitri had upset as he ran past it. "At him!" shouted the old man. "Help!" Ivan and Alyosha caught the old man and were forcibly bringing him back. "Why do you run after him? He'll murder you outright," Ivan cried wrathfully at his father. "Ivan! Alyosha! She must be here. Grushenka's here. He said he saw her himself, running." He was choking. He was not expecting Grushenka at the time, and the sudden news that she was here made him beside himself. He was trembling all over. He seemed frantic. "But you've seen for yourself that she hasn't come," cried Ivan. "But she may have come by that other entrance." "You know that entrance is locked, and you have the key." Dmitri suddenly reappeared in the drawing-room. He had, of course, found the other entrance locked, and the key...

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