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354CABEZA
228CADA
191CALL
196CALLE
242CALLED
146CAMA
139CAMBIO
644CAME
175CAMINO
1095CAN
142CANDLE
291CANNOT
195CAPITULO
273CAPTAIN
193CARA
167CARACTER
179CARE
136CARRI
250CARRIAGE
338CARTA
1007CASA
359CASE
360CASI
242CASO
534CATALINA
147CAUGHT
143CAUSA
149CAUSE
150CERCA
304CERTAIN
254CERTAINLY
308CHAIR
138CHANGE
221CHAPTER
211CHARACTER
2807CHE
186CHER
344CHILD
360CHILDREN
201CHURCH
133CIERTA
217CIERTO
181CINCO
177CIRCUMSTANCE
140CIUDAD
139CLARO
196CLEAR
193CLERK
140CLEVER
258CLOCK
136CLOSE
196COAT
165COLD
238COLIA
242COM
1412COME
2062COMO
134COMPANY
134COMPLETE
159COMPLETELY
154COMPRENDER
162COMPRENDO
3609CON
135CONDITION
152CONFESS
152CONMIGO
157CONTINUED
141CONTINUO
212CONTRA
195CONTRARIO
171CONTRARY
146CONVERSACION
230CONVERSATION
138CONVINCED
324CORAZON
239CORNER
484COS
623COSA
325COSAS
1198COULD
152COULDN
703COURSE
168COURT
174CREATURE
195CREE
259CREO
768CRIED
173CRIME
238CRIMEN
169CRIMINAL
155CROSS
224CROWD
263CRY
178CUAL
820CUANDO
274CUANTO
151CUATRO
254CUENTA
147CULPABLE
139CURIOSITY

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1. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы)
Входимость: 1. Размер: 80кб.
Часть текста: man and entered into the swine; and the herd ran violently down a steep place into the lake and were choked. “When they that fed them saw what was done, they fled, and went and told it in the city and in the country. “Then they went out to see what was done; and came to Jesus and found the man, out of whom the devils were departed, sitting at the feet of Jesus, clothed and in his right mind; and they were afraid.” Luke, ch. viii. 32-37. PART I CHAPTER I. INTRODUCTORY SOME DETAILS OF THE BIOGRAPHY OF THAT HIGHLY RESPECTED GENTLEMAN STEFAN TEOFIMOVITCH VERHOVENSKY. IN UNDERTAKING to describe the recent and strange incidents in our town, till lately wrapped in uneventful obscurity, I find' myself forced in absence of literary skill to begin my story rather far back, that is to say, with certain biographical details concerning that talented and highly-esteemed gentleman, Stepan Trofimovitch Verhovensky. I trust that these details may at least serve as an introduction, while my projected story itself will come later. I will say at once that Stepan Trofimovitch had always filled a particular role among us, that of the progressive patriot, so to say, and he ...
2. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part one. Chapter Five
Входимость: 1. Размер: 25кб.
Часть текста: ordinary action. "Could I have expected to set it all straight and to find a way out by means of Razumihin alone?" he asked himself in perplexity. He pondered and rubbed his forehead, and, strange to say, after long musing, suddenly, as if it were spontaneously and by chance, a fantastic thought came into his head. "Hm... to Razumihin's," he said all at once, calmly, as though he had reached a final determination. "I shall go to Razumihin's of course, but... not now. I shall go to him... on the next day after It, when It will be over and everything will begin afresh...." And suddenly he realised what he was thinking. "After It," he shouted, jumping up from the seat, "but is It really going to happen? Is it possible it really will happen?" He left the seat, and went off almost at a run; he meant to turn back, homewards, but the thought of going home suddenly filled him with intense loathing; in that hole, in that awful little cupboard of his, all this had for a month past been growing up in him; and he walked on at random. His nervous shudder had passed into a fever that made him feel shivering; in spite of the heat he felt cold. With a kind of effort he began almost unconsciously, from some inner craving, to stare at all the objects before him, as though looking for something to distract his attention; but he did not succeed, and...
3. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 33кб.
Часть текста: if those good souls, in the boundless kindness of their hearts, were desirous of saving the eccentric young fellow from ruin, they were unable to take any stronger measures to attain that end. Neither their position, nor their private inclination, perhaps (and only naturally), would allow them to use any more pronounced means. We have observed before that even some of the prince's nearest neighbours had begun to oppose him. Vera Lebedeff's passive disagreement was limited to the shedding of a few solitary tears; to more frequent sitting alone at home, and to a diminished frequency in her visits to the prince's apartments. Colia was occupied with his father at this time. The old man died during a second stroke, which took place just eight days after the first. The prince showed great sympathy in the grief of the family, and during the first days of their mourning he was at the house a great deal with Nina Alexandrovna. He went to the funeral, and it was observable that the public assembled in church greeted his arrival and departure with whisperings, and watched him closely. The same thing happened in the park and in the street, wherever he went. He was pointed out when he drove by, and he often overheard the name of Nastasia Philipovna coupled with his own as he passed. People looked out for her at the funeral, too, but she was not there; and another conspicuous absentee was the captain's widow, whom Lebedeff had prevented from coming. The funeral service produced a great effect on the prince. He whispered to Lebedeff that this was the first time he had ever heard a Russian funeral service since he was a little boy. Observing that he was looking about him uneasily, Lebedeff asked him whom he was seeking. "Nothing. I only thought I--" "Is it Rogojin?" "Why--is he here?" "Yes, he's in church." "I thought I caught sight of his eyes!" muttered the prince, in confusion. "But what of it!--Why is he...
4. Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground (English. Записки из подполья). Part I. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 4кб.
Часть текста: that it is of crystal and can never be destroyed and that one cannot put one's tongue out at it even on the sly. You see, if it were not a palace, but a hen-house, I might creep into it to avoid getting wet, and yet I would not call the hen-house a palace out of gratitude to it for keeping me dry. You laugh and say that in such circumstances a hen-house is as good as a mansion. Yes, I answer, if one had to live simply to keep out of the rain. But what is to be done if I have taken it into my head that that is not the only object in life, and that if one must live one had better live in a mansion? That is my choice, my desire. You will only eradicate it when you have changed my preference. Well, do change it, allure me with something else, give me another ideal. But meanwhile I will not take a hen-house for a mansion. The palace of crystal may be an idle dream, it may be that it is inconsistent with the laws of nature and that I have invented it only through my own stupidity, through the old-fashioned irrational habits of my generation. But what does it matter to me that it is inconsistent? That makes no difference since it exists in my desires, or rather exists as long as my desires exist. Perhaps you are laughing again? Laugh away; I will put up with any mockery rather than pretend that I am satisfied when I am hungry. I know, anyway, that I will not be put off with a compromise, with a recurring zero, simply because it is consistent with the laws of nature and actually exists. I will not accept as the crown of my desires a block of buildings with tenements for the poor on a lease of a thousand years, and perhaps with a sign-board of a dentist hanging out. Destroy my...
5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VII. A meeting
Входимость: 1. Размер: 59кб.
Часть текста: up in conversation.” Madame Virginsky was a midwife by profession—and by that very fact was on the lowest rung of the social ladder, lower even than the priest's wife in spite of her husband's rank as an officer. But she was conspicuously lacking in the humility befitting her position. And after her very stupid and unpardonably open liaison on principle with Captain Lebyadkin, a notorious rogue, even the most indulgent of our ladies turned away from her with marked contempt. But Madame Virginsky accepted all this as though it were what she wanted. It is remarkable that those very ladies applied to Arina Prohorovna (that is, Madame Virginsky) when they were in an interesting condition, rather than to any one of the other three accoucheuses of the town. She was sent for even by country families living in the neighbourhood, so great was the belief in her knowledge, luck, and skill in critical cases. It ended in her practising only among the wealthiest ladies; she was greedy of money. Feeling her power to the full, she ended by not putting herself out for anyone. Possibly on purpose, indeed, in her practice in the best houses she used to scare nervous patients by the most incredible and nihilistic disregard of good manners, or by jeering at “everything holy,” at the very time when “everything holy” might have come in most useful. Our town doctor, Rozanov—he too was an accoucheur—asserted most positively that on one occasion when a patient in labour was crying out and calling on the name of the Almighty, a free-thinking sally from Arina Prohorovna, fired off like a pistol-shot, had so terrifying an effect on the patient that...

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