Cлова на букву "F"


А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Поиск  

Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 825).
Чтобы посмотреть все варианты, нажмите

 Кол-во Слово
749FACE
598FACT
95FAIL
168FAITH
153FALL
163FALTA
162FAMILIA
297FAMILY
93FANCIED
182FANCY
291FAR
146FARE
97FASHION
115FATE
897FATHER
173FATTO
125FAULT
156FEAR
258FEEL
400FEELING
152FEET
96FELICIDAD
95FELIZ
204FELL
372FELLOW
423FELT
97FERDISHENKO
112FEVER
205FEW
128FIFTEEN
109FIFTY
124FIGURE
118FIL
117FILIPPOVITCH
401FIN
111FINAL
113FINALLY
104FINALMENTE
322FIND
120FINE
160FINGER
97FINISHED
108FINO
312FIODOR
486FIODOROVITCH
211FIRE
101FIRMLY
739FIRST
137FIT
320FIVE
115FIXED
108FLASH
185FLAT
104FLEW
162FLOOR
98FLUNG
142FLUSH
112FLY
259FOLLOW
162FOND
269FOOL
123FOOT
105FORCE
149FORGET
266FORGIVE
157FORGOTTEN
148FORM
205FORMA
95FORMER
135FORSE
114FORTUNE
96FORTY
155FORWARD
120FOSSE
323FOUND
224FOUR
138FRANCE
167FREE
113FREEDOM
111FRENCH
92FRENCHMAN
132FRENTE
94FRESH
576FRIEND
206FRIGHTEN
2200FROM
92FRONT
428FUE
223FUERA
123FUERZA
130FUERZAS
113FUI
217FULL
104FULLY
94FUORI
102FUR
116FURTHER
167FUTURE
310FYODOR
341FYODOROVITCH

Несколько случайно найденных страниц

по слову FACING

1. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter V
Входимость: 1. Размер: 19кб.
Часть текста: close to the Ismailovsky Bridge, fleeing from his foes, from persecution, from a hailstorm of nips and pinches aimed at him, from the shrieks of excited old ladies, from the Ohs and Ahs of women and from the murderous eyes of Andrey Filippovitch. Mr. Golyadkin was killed - killed entirely, in the full sense of the word, and if he still preserved the power of running, it was simply through some sort of miracle, a miracle in which at last he refused himself to believe. It was an awful November night - wet, foggy, rainy, snowy, teeming with colds in the head, fevers, swollen faces, quinseys, inflammations of all kinds and descriptions - teeming, in fact, with all the gifts of a Petersburg November. The wind howled in the deserted streets, lifting up the black water of the canal above the rings on the bank, and irritably brushing against the lean lamp-posts which chimed in with its howling in a thin, shrill creak, keeping up the endless squeaky, jangling concert with which every inhabitant of Petersburg is so familiar. Snow and rain were falling both at once. Lashed by the wind, the streams of rainwater spurted almost horizontally, as though from a fireman's hose, pricking and stinging the face of the luckless Mr. Golyadkin like a thousand pins and needles. In the stillness of the night, broken only by the distant rumbling of carriages, the howl of the wind and the creaking of the lamp-posts, there was the dismal sound of the splash and gurgle of water, rushing from every roof, every porch,...
2. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part III. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 49кб.
Часть текста: her position; she certainly had a will of her own! On the pretext of his health the old prince had been in the nick of time carried off to Tsarskoe Syelo so that the news of his approaching marriage with Anna Andreyevna might not be spread abroad, but might for the time be stifled, so to say, in embryo, yet the feeble old man, with whom one could do anything else, would not on any consideration have consented to give up his idea and jilt Anna Andreyevna, who had made him an offer. On this subject he was a paragon of chivalry, so that he might sooner or later bestir himself and suddenly proceed to carry out his intentions with that irresistible force which is so very frequently met with in weak characters, for they often have a line beyond which they cannot be driven. Moreover, he fully recognised the delicacy of the position of Anna Andreyevna, for whom he had an unbounded respect; he was quite alive to the possibility of rumours, of gibes, of injurious gossip. The only thing that checked him and kept him quiet for the time was that Katerina Nikolaevna had never once allowed herself to drop the faintest hint reflecting on Anna Andreyevna in his presence, or to raise the faintest objection to his intention of marrying her; on the contrary, she showed the greatest cordiality and every attention to her father's fiancee. In this way Anna Andreyevna was placed in an extremely awkward position, perceiving with her subtle feminine instinct that she would wound all the old prince's tenderest feelings, and would arouse his distrust and even, perhaps, his indignation by the slightest criticism of Katerina Nikolaevna, whom he worshipped, too, and now more than ever just because she had so graciously and dutifully consented to his marriage. And so for the present the conflict was waged on that plane: the two rivals vied with one another in delicacy and patience, and as time went on the prince did not know which of them to admire the most, and like all weak but...
3. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VI. Pyotr Stepanovitch is busy
Входимость: 2. Размер: 105кб.
Часть текста: with cholera; serious outbreaks of cattle plague had appeared in several places; fires were prevalent that summer in towns and villages; whilst among the peasantry foolish rumours of incendiarism grew stronger and stronger. Cases of robbery were twice as numerous as usual. But all this, of course, would have been perfectly ordinary had there been no other and more weighty reasons to disturb the equanimity of Audrey Antonovitch, who had till then been in good spirits. What struck Yulia Mihailovna most of all was that he became more silent and, strange to say, more secretive every day. Yet it was hard to imagine what he had to hide. It is true that he rarely opposed her and as a rule followed her lead without question. At her instigation, for instance, two or three regulations of a risky and hardly legal character were introduced with the object of strengthening the authority of the governor. There were several ominous instances of transgressions being condoned with the same end in view; persons who deserved to be sent to prison and Siberia were, solely because she insisted, recommended for promotion. Certain complaints and inquiries were deliberately and systematically ignored. All this came out later on. Not only did Lembke sign everything, but he did not even go into the question of ...
4. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter III
Входимость: 1. Размер: 49кб.
Часть текста: she suspected that, anyway. It was a duel to the death. And yet--I was not offended! It was an insult, but I did not feel it. How should I? I was positively glad of it; though I had come here to hate her I felt I was beginning to love her. I don't know whether the spider perhaps does not hate the fly he has marked and is snaring. Dear little fly! It seems to me that the victim is loved, or at least may be loved. Here I love my enemy; I am delighted, for instance, that she is so beautiful. I am delighted, madam, that you are so haughty and majestic. If you were meeker it would not be so delightful. You have spat on me-- and I am triumphant. If you were literally to spit in my face I should really not be angry because you--are my victim; MINE and not HIS. How fascinating was that idea! Yes, the secret consciousness of power is more insupportably delightful than open domination. If I were a millionaire I believe I should take pleasure in going about in the oldest clothes and being taken for a destitute man, almost a beggar, being jostled and despised. The consciousness of the truth...
5. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part III. Chapter V
Входимость: 2. Размер: 52кб.
Часть текста: Подросток). Part III. Chapter V CHAPTER V 1 As soon as I was announced, Anna Andreyevna threw down her sewing and rushed to meet me in the outermost of her rooms, a thing which had never happened before. She held out both hands to me and flushed quickly. She led me into her room in silence, sat down to her needlework again, made me sit down beside her. She did not go on with her sewing, but still scrutinized me with the same fervent sympathy, without uttering a word. "You sent Darya Onisimovna to me," I began bluntly, rather overwhelmed by this exaggerated display of sympathy, though I found it agreeable. She suddenly began talking without answering my question. "I have heard all about it, I know all about it. That terrible night. . . . Oh, what you must have gone through! Can it be true! Can it be true that you were found unconscious in the frost?" "You heard that. . . from Lambert. . . ." I muttered, reddening. "I heard it all from him at the time; but I've been eager to see you. Oh, he came to me in alarm! At your lodging. . . where you have...

© 2000- NIV