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    А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
    0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
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    102GAIN
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    60GATHERED
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    61GAVRILA
    66GAZE
    127GAZED
    87GAZING
    905GENERAL
    267GENERALE
    73GENERALLY
    73GENERATION
    90GENEROUS
    209GENTE
    75GENTLE
    205GENTLEMAN
    416GENTLEMEN
    75GENUINE
    187GERMAN
    146GESTO
    71GESTURE
    520GET
    179GETTING
    63GIFT
    79GIORNO
    386GIRL
    551GIVE
    225GIVEN
    120GIVING
    180GLAD
    123GLANCE
    79GLANCED
    178GLASS
    64GLEAM
    474GLI
    99GLOOMY
    677GOD
    78GOES
    546GOING
    109GOLD
    830GOLJADKIN
    84GOLPE
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    803GOLYADKIN
    267GONE
    847GOOD
    97GOODNESS
    74GOSSIP
    461GOT
    88GOVERNMENT
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    103GRACIA
    65GRADO
    65GRADUALLY
    308GRAN
    111GRAND
    121GRANDE
    109GRANDES
    126GRANDFATHER
    136GRANDMOTHER
    67GRANT
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    65GRATEFUL
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    112GRAVE
    646GREAT
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    93GREATEST
    92GREATLY
    85GREEN
    113GREW
    84GREY
    91GRIEF
    103GRIER
    226GRIEUX
    191GRIGORI
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    227GRITO
    95GRITOS
    147GROUND
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    415GRUCHEGNKA
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    93GUARD
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    1. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part III. Chapter I
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 37кб.
    Часть текста: they ran off at the slightest obstacle. Other houses were governed by a timid routine; theirs was somehow different. Perhaps Lizabetha Prokofievna was alone in making these fretful observations; the girls, though not wanting in intelligence, were still young; the general was intelligent, too, but narrow, and in any difficulty he was content to say, "H'm!" and leave the matter to his wife. Consequently, on her fell the responsibility. It was not that they distinguished themselves as a family by any particular originality, or that their excursions off the track led to any breach of the proprieties. Oh no. There was nothing premeditated, there was not even any conscious purpose in it all, and yet, in spite of everything, the family, although highly respected, was not quite what every highly respected family ought to be. For a long time now Lizabetha Prokofievna had had it in her mind that all the trouble was owing to her "unfortunate character, "and this added to her distress. She blamed her own stupid unconventional "eccentricity." Always restless, always on the go, she constantly seemed to lose her way, and to get into trouble over the simplest and more ordinary affairs of life. We said at the beginning of our story, that the Epanchins were liked and esteemed by their neighbours. In spite of his humble origin, Ivan Fedorovitch himself was received everywhere with respect. He deserved this, partly on account of his wealth and position, partly because, though limited, he was really a very good fellow. But a certain limitation of mind seems to be an indispensable asset, if not to all public personages, at least to all serious financiers. Added to this, his...
    2. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part III. Chapter IV
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 38кб.
    Часть текста: All the guests were known to the prince; but the curious part of the matter was that they had all arrived on the same evening, as though with one accord, although he had only himself recollected the fact that it was his birthday a few moments since. "You must have told somebody you were going to trot out the champagne, and that's why they are all come!" muttered Rogojin, as the two entered the verandah. "We know all about that! You've only to whistle and they come up in shoals!" he continued, almost angrily. He was doubtless thinking of his own late experiences with his boon companions. All surrounded the prince with exclamations of welcome, and, on hearing that it was his birthday, with cries of congratulation and delight; many of them were very noisy. The presence of certain of those in the room surprised the prince vastly, but the guest whose advent filled him with the greatest wonder--almost amounting to alarm--was Evgenie Pavlovitch. The prince could not believe his eyes when he beheld the latter, and ...
    3. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter II. Prince harry. Matchmaking
    Входимость: 1. Размер: 96кб.
    Часть текста: he was a child himself. I was not there in those days, and he continually felt the want of a real friend. He did not hesitate to make a friend of this little creature as soon as he had grown a little older. It somehow came to pass quite naturally that there seemed to be no discrepancy of age between them. More than once he awaked his ten- or eleven-year-old friend at night, simply to pour out his wounded feelings and weep before him, or to tell him some family secret, without realising that this was an outrageous proceeding. They threw themselves into each other's arms and wept. The boy knew that his mother loved him very much, but I doubt whether he cared much for her. She talked little to him and did not often interfere with him, but he was always morbidly conscious of her intent, searching eyes fixed upon him. Yet the mother confided his whole instruction and moral education to Stepan Trofimovitch. At that time her faith in him was unshaken. One can't help believing that the tutor had rather a bad influence on his pupil's nerves. When at sixteen he was taken to a lyceum he was fragile-looking and pale, strangely quiet and dreamy. (Later on he was distinguished by great physical strength.) One must assume too that the friends went on weeping at night, throwing themselves in each other's arms, though their tears were not always due to domestic difficulties. Stepan Trofimovitch succeeded in reaching the deepest chords in his pupil's heart, and had aroused in him a vague sensation of that eternal, sacred yearning which some elect souls can never give up for cheap gratification when once they have tasted and known it. (There are some connoisseurs who prize this yearning more than the most complete satisfaction of it, if such were possible.) But in any case it was just as well that the pupil and the preceptor were, though none too soon, parted. For the first two years the...

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