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267HABER
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379HABITACION
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153HABLABA
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309HABLAR
127HABLO
113HABRA
545HABRIA
466HACE
384HACER
101HACERLO
629HACIA
4892HAD
170HAIR
327HALF
92HALL
354HAN
909HAND
438HAPPEN
152HAPPINESS
244HAPPY
104HARD
188HARDLY
1179HAS
600HASTA
189HASTE
109HASTEN
198HAT
97HATE
93HATRED
3293HAVE
182HAVEN
219HAVING
537HAY
183HAYA
512HEAD
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265HEAR
447HEARD
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163HEAVEN
403HECHO
94HECHOS
158HELD
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5375HER
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217HERMANA
338HERMANO
95HERMANOS
269HERO
400HERSELF
93HICE
137HIGH
156HIJA
250HIJO
119HIJOS
3946HIM
940HIMSELF
119HINT
214HIPPOLYTE
5300HIS
150HISTORIA
207HIZO
95HOHLAKOV
184HOLD
99HOLDING
120HOLY
881HOMBRE
360HOME
122HONEST
109HONOR
231HONOUR
115HONOURABLE
208HOPE
189HORA
101HORAS
116HORROR
151HORSE
92HOSPITAL
194HOTEL
348HOUR
584HOUSE
1306HOW
347HOWEVER
319HOY
216HUBIERA
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357HUNDRED
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по слову HONOUR

1. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter III
Входимость: 6. Размер: 28кб.
Часть текста: which he had contracted of late years. He would suddenly remember that he was "a father," would be reconciled with his wife, and shed genuine tears. His feeling for Nina Alexandrovna amounted almost to adoration; she had pardoned so much in silence, and loved him still in spite of the state of degradation into which he had fallen. But the general's struggles with his own weakness never lasted very long. He was, in his way, an impetuous man, and a quiet life of repentance in the bosom of his family soon became insupportable to him. In the end he rebelled, and flew into rages which he regretted, perhaps, even as he gave way to them, but which were beyond his control. He picked quarrels with everyone, began to hold forth eloquently, exacted unlimited respect, and at last disappeared from the house, and sometimes did not return for a long time. He had given up interfering in the affairs of his family for two years now, and knew nothing about them but what he gathered from hearsay. But on this occasion there was something more serious than usual. Everyone seemed to know something, but to be afraid to talk about it. The general had turned up in the bosom of his family two or three days before, but not, as usual, with the olive branch of peace in his hand, not in the garb of penitence--in which he was usually clad...
2. Dostoevsky. The Gambler (English. Игрок). Chapter VI
Входимость: 3. Размер: 20кб.
Часть текста: a fuss and a chattering and an uproar there was! And what a welter of unseemliness and disorder and stupidity and bad manners! And I the cause of it all! Yet part of the scene was also ridiculous--at all events to myself it was so. I am not quite sure what was the matter with me--whether I was merely stupefied or whether I purposely broke loose and ran amok. At times my mind seems all confused; while at other times I seem almost to be back in my childhood, at the school desk, and to have done the deed simply out of mischief. It all came of Polina--yes, of Polina. But for her, there might never have been a fracas. Or perhaps I did the deed in a fit of despair (though it may be foolish of me to think so)? What there is so attractive about her I cannot think. Yet there IS something attractive about her--something passing fair, it would seem. Others besides myself she has driven to distraction. She is tall and straight, and very slim. Her body looks as though it could be tied into a knot, or bent double, like a cord. The imprint of her foot is long and narrow. It is, a maddening imprint--yes, simply a maddening one! And her hair has a reddish tint about it, and her eyes are like cat's eyes--though able also to glance with proud, disdainful mien. On the evening of my first arrival, four months ago, I remember that she was sitting and holding an animated conversation with De Griers in the salon. And the way in which she looked at him was such that later, when I retired to my own room...
3. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VII. A meeting
Входимость: 3. Размер: 59кб.
Часть текста: On the pretext of Virginsky's-name-day party, about fifteen guests were assembled; but the entertainment was not in the least like an ordinary provincial name-day party. From the very beginning of their married life the husband and wife had agreed once for all that it was utterly stupid to invite friends to celebrate name-days, and that “there is nothing to rejoice about in fact.” In a few years they had succeeded in completely cutting themselves off from all society. Though he was a man of some ability, and by no means very poor, he somehow seemed to every one an eccentric fellow who was fond of solitude, and, what's more, “stuck up in conversation.” Madame Virginsky was a midwife by profession—and by that very fact was on the lowest rung of the social ladder, lower even than the priest's wife in spite of her husband's rank as an officer. But she was conspicuously lacking in the humility befitting her position. And after her very stupid and unpardonably open liaison on principle with Captain Lebyadkin, a notorious rogue, even the most indulgent of our ladies turned away from her with marked contempt. But Madame Virginsky accepted all this as though it were what she wanted. It is remarkable that those very ladies applied to Arina Prohorovna (that is, Madame Virginsky) when they were in an interesting condition, rather than to any one of the other three accoucheuses of the town. She was sent for even by country families living in the neighbourhood, so great was the belief in her knowledge,...
4. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part II. Chapter VII
Входимость: 7. Размер: 48кб.
Часть текста: down by the window and began thinking. So I sat till ten o'clock. The servant knocked at my door twice, but I sent her away. At last at eleven o'clock there was a knock again. I was just going to shout to the servant again, but it was Liza. The servant came in with her, brought me in some coffee, and prepared to light the stove. It was impossible to get rid of the servant, and all the time Fekla was arranging the wood, and blowing up the fire, I strode up and down my little room, not beginning to talk to Liza, and even trying not to look at her. The servant, as though on purpose, was inexpressibly slow in her movements as servants always are when they notice they are preventing people from talking. Liza sat on the chair by the window and watched me. "Your coffee will be cold," she said suddenly. I looked at her: not a trace of embarrassment, perfect tranquillity, and even a smile on her lips. "Such are women," I thought, and could not help shrugging my shoulders. At last the...
5. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter X
Входимость: 3. Размер: 45кб.
Часть текста: been here for some time. His face looked overcast and careworn. "What I regret most of all," he began saying slowly to Vassin, evidently in continuation of what they had been discussing outside, "is that I had no time to set it all right yesterday evening; then probably this terrible thing would not have happened! And indeed there was time, it was hardly eight o'clock. As soon as she ran away from us last night, I inwardly resolved to follow her and to reassure her, but this unforeseen and urgent business, though of course I might quite well have put it off till to-day. . . or even for a week--this vexatious turn of affairs has hindered and ruined everything. That's just how things do happen!" "Perhaps you would not have succeeded in reassuring her; things had gone too far already, apart from you," Vassin put in. "No, I should have succeeded, I certainly should have succeeded. And the idea did occur to me to send Sofia Andreyevna in my place. It flashed across my mind, but nothing more. Sofia Andreyevna alone would have convinced her, and the unhappy girl would have been alive. No, never again will I meddle. . . in 'good works'. . . and it is the only time in my life I have done it! And I imagined that I had kept up with the times and understood the younger generation. But we elders grow old almost before we grow ripe. And, by the way, there are a terrible number of modern people who go on considering themselves the younger generation from habit, because only yesterday they were such, and meantime they don't notice that they are no longer under the ban of the orthodox." "There has...

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