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272IBA
845IDEA
105IDEAL
112IDIOT
140IDO
131IGLESIA
82IGNORO
79IGUAL
69IKON
81ILITCH
160ILIUCHA
272ILL
134ILLNESS
172ILUSHA
101ILYITCH
71IMAGE
60IMAGINACION
188IMAGINE
99IMAGINED
93IMBECIL
148IMMEDIATELY
67IMMENSE
73IMPATIENCE
61IMPATIENT
67IMPATIENTLY
172IMPORTA
72IMPORTANCE
98IMPORTANCIA
158IMPORTANT
106IMPORTANTE
145IMPOSIBLE
194IMPOSSIBLE
108IMPRESION
68IMPRESSED
154IMPRESSION
79IMPULSE
64INCAPABLE
75INCAPAZ
108INCIDENT
62INCLINO
600INCLUSO
371INDEED
78INDIGNACION
94INDIGNATION
62INDISPENSABLE
83INFANCIA
89INFINE
116INFLUENCE
83INFORMATION
96INFORMED
73INJURED
70INMOVIL
91INNOCENT
60INQUIETA
95INQUIETUD
83INQUIRED
62INQUIRY
108INSIST
178INSTANCE
141INSTANT
170INSTANTE
114INSTANTLY
126INSTEAD
89INSTRUCCION
214INSULT
64INSULTING
71INTELIGENCIA
97INTELIGENTE
75INTELLIGENCE
70INTELLIGENT
101INTENCION
76INTEND
84INTENSE
107INTENTION
106INTENTLY
79INTERES
177INTEREST
95INTERESTED
114INTERESTING
68INTERIOR
76INTERRUMPIO
127INTERRUPTED
88INTERVIEW
1021INTO
79INTORNO
63INTRIGUE
77INVALID
84INVITED
82IRA
104IRE
61IRRESISTIBLE
68IRRITABLE
64IRRITATED
161ISN
347ITS
137ITSELF
1296IVAN
562IVANOVITCH
925IVANOVNA
78IZQUIERDA

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1. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part III. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 48кб.
Часть текста: To B. 's, in Great Morskaya." "A restaurant?" I asked with some hesitation. "Yes, why not? I don't often have supper at home. Surely you won't refuse to be my guest?" "But I've told you already that I never take supper." "But once in a way doesn't matter; especially as I'm inviting you. . ." Which meant he would pay for me. I am certain that he added that intentionally. I allowed myself to be taken, but made up my mind to pay for myself in the restaurant. We arrived. The prince engaged a private room, and with the taste of a connois- seur selected two or three dishes. They were expensive and so was the bottle of delicate wine which he ordered. All this was beyond my means. I looked at the bill of fare and ordered half a woodcock and a glass of Lafitte. The prince looked at this. "You won't sup with me! Why, this is positively ridiculous! Pardon, mon ami, but this is. . . revolting punctiliousness. It's the paltriest vanity. There's almost a suspicion of class feeling about this. I don't mind betting that's it. I assure you you're offending me." But I stuck to my point. "But, as you like," he added. "I won't insist. . . . Tell me, Ivan Petrovitch, may I speak to you as a friend?" "I beg you to do so." "Well, then, to my thinking such punctiliousness stands in your way. All you people stand in your own light in that way. You are a literary man; you ought to know the world, and you hold yourself aloof from everything. I'm not talking of your woodcock now, but you are ready to refuse to associate with our circle altogether, and that's against your interests. Apart from the fact that you lose a great deal, a career, in fact, if only that you ought to know what you're describing, and in...
2. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XII. A Judicial Error. Chapter 2.Dangerous Witnesses
Входимость: 1. Размер: 24кб.
Часть текста: episode, which occurred before the final speeches, and undoubtedly influenced the sinister and fatal outcome of the trial. I will only observe that from the first moments of the trial one peculiar characteristic of the case was conspicuous and observed by all, that is, the overwhelming strength of the prosecution as compared with the arguments the defence had to rely upon. Everyone realised it from the first moment that the facts began to group themselves round a single point, and the whole horrible and bloody crime was gradually revealed. Everyone, perhaps, felt from the first that the case was beyond dispute, that there was no doubt about it, that there could be really no discussion, and that the defence was only a matter of form, and that the prisoner was guilty, obviously and conclusively guilty. I imagine that even the ladies, who were so impatiently longing for the acquittal of the interesting prisoner, were at the same time, without exception, convinced of his guilt. What's more, I believe they would have been mortified if his guilt had not been so firmly established, as that would have lessened the effect of the closing scene of the criminal's acquittal. That he would be acquitted, all the ladies, strange to say, were firmly persuaded up to the very last moment. "He is guilty, but he will be acquitted, from motives of humanity, in accordance with the new ideas, the new sentiments that had come into fashion," and so on, and so on. And that was why they had crowded into the court so impatiently. The men were more interested in the contest between the prosecutor and the famous Fetyukovitch. All were wondering and asking themselves what could even a talent like...
3. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XII. A Judicial Error. Chapter 14.The Peasants Stand Firm
Входимость: 1. Размер: 17кб.
Часть текста: Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XII. A Judicial Error. Chapter 14.The Peasants Stand Firm Chapter 14 The Peasants Stand Firm THIS was how Fetyukovitch concluded his speech, and the enthusiasm of the audience burst like an irresistible storm. It was out of the question to stop it: the women wept, many of the men wept too, even two important personages shed tears. The President submitted, and even postponed ringing his bell. The suppression of such an enthusiasm would be the suppression of something sacred, as the ladies cried afterwards. The orator himself was genuinely touched. And it was at this moment that Ippolit Kirillovitch got up to make certain objections. People looked at him with hatred. "What? What's the meaning of it? He positively dares to make objections," the ladies babbled. But if the whole world of ladies, including his wife, had protested he could not have been stopped at that moment. He was pale, he was shaking with emotion, his first phrases were even unintelligible, he gasped for breath, could hardly speak clearly, lost the thread. But he soon recovered himself. Of this new speech of his I will quote only a few sentences. "... I am reproached with having woven a romance. But what is this defence if not one romance on the top of another? All that was lacking was poetry. Fyodor Pavlovitch, while waiting for his mistress, tears open the envelope and throws it on the floor. We are...
4. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter III. The sins of others
Входимость: 2. Размер: 104кб.
Часть текста: A week passed and he still did not know whether he were betrothed or not, and could not find out for a fact, however much he tried. He had not yet seen his future bride, and did not know whether she was to be his bride or not; did not, in fact, know whether there was anything serious in it at all. Varvara Petrovna, for some reason, resolutely refused to admit him to her presence. In answer to one of his first letters to her (and he wrote a great number of them) she begged him plainly to spare her all communications with him for a time, because she was very busy, and having a great deal of the utmost importance to communicate to him she was waiting for a more free moment to do so, and that she would let him know in time when he could come to see her. She declared she would send back his letters unopened, as they were “simple self-indulgence.” I read that letter myself—he showed it me. Yet all this harshness and indefiniteness were nothing compared with his chief anxiety. That anxiety tormented him to the utmost and without ceasing. He grew thin and dispirited through it. It was something of which he was more ashamed than of anything else, and of which he would not on any account speak, even to me; on the contrary, he lied on occasion, and shuffled before me like a little boy; and at the same time he sent for me himself every day, could not stay two hours without me, needing me as much as air or water. Such conduct rather wounded my vanity. I need hardly say that I had long ago privately guessed this great secret of his, and saw through it completely. It was my firmest conviction at the time that the revelation of this secret, this chief anxiety of Stepan Trofimovitch's would not have redounded to his...
5. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter VII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 35кб.
Часть текста: distinctly that I had not come off with flying colours downstairs. Even Tatyana Pavlovna's spiteful abuse of me struck me as funny and amusing and did not anger me at all. Probably all this was because I had anyway broken my chains and for the first time felt myself free. I felt, too, that I had weakened my position: how I was to act in regard to the letter about the inheritance was more obscure than ever. Now it would be certainly taken for granted that I was revenging myself on Versilov. But while all this discussion was going on downstairs I had made up my mind to submit the question of the letter to an impartial outsider and to appeal to Vassin for his decision, or, failing Vassin, to take it to some one else. I had already made up my mind to whom. I would go to see Vassin once, for that occasion only, I thought to myself, and then--then I would vanish for a long while, for some months, from the sight of all, especially of Vassin. Only my mother and sister I might see occasionally. It was all inconsistent and confused; I felt that I had done something, though not in the right way, and I was satisfied: I repeat, I was awfully pleased anyway. I meant to go to bed rather early, foreseeing I should have a lot to do next day. Besides finding a lodging and moving, I had another project which in one way or another I meant to carry out. But the evening was not destined to end without surprises, and Versilov succeeded in astonishing me extremely. He had certainly never been into my attic, and lo and behold, before I had been an hour in my room I heard his footsteps on the ladder: he called to me to show a light. I took a candle, and stretching out my...

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