Cлова на букву "L"


А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Поиск  

Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 616).
Чтобы посмотреть все варианты, нажмите

 Кол-во Слово
143LABIOS
227LADIES
211LADO
355LADY
162LAGRIMAS
101LAID
630LAMBERT
158LANDLADY
81LANDLORD
106LANZO
141LARGE
108LARGO
2052LAS
847LAST
199LATE
292LATER
238LATTER
449LAUGH
282LAUGHING
146LAUGHTER
157LAW
127LAWYER
206LAY
127LEAD
109LEARNED
252LEAST
281LEAVE
99LEAVING
377LEBEDEFF
143LEBYADKIN
117LED
432LEFT
139LEG
235LEI
115LEJOS
131LEMBKE
99LENGTH
334LES
152LESS
100LESSON
658LET
713LETTER
175LEVANTO
96LIBERTAD
84LIBRE
113LIBRO
160LIE
113LIES
660LIFE
88LIFT
225LIGHT
1183LIKE
130LIKED
126LIKELY
119LINE
187LIP
236LIPUTIN
260LISA
472LISE
517LISTEN
119LITERARY
900LITTLE
271LIVE
160LIVED
86LIVES
182LIVING
464LIZA
185LIZABETHA
178LIZAVETA
139LLEGADO
131LLEGAR
145LLEGO
86LLENO
140LLEVABA
88LLEVAR
100LLORAR
92LOCKED
128LOCO
187LODGING
602LONG
122LONGER
1520LOOK
139LORD
140LORO
3113LOS
106LOSE
249LOST
143LOT
85LOUD
880LOVE
204LOVED
111LOW
331LUEGO
152LUGAR
364LUI
148LUJINE
96LUZ
113LUZHIN
82LYAMSHIN
186LYING

Несколько случайно найденных страниц

по слову LID

1. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part one. Chapter Seven
Входимость: 1. Размер: 28кб.
Часть текста: nearly made a great mistake. Fearing the old woman would be frightened by their being alone, and not hoping that the sight of him would disarm her suspicions, he took hold of the door and drew it towards him to prevent the old woman from attempting to shut it again. Seeing this she did not pull the door back, but she did not let go the handle so that he almost dragged her out with it on to the stairs. Seeing that she was standing in the doorway not allowing him to pass, he advanced straight upon her. She stepped back in alarm, tried to say something, but seemed unable to speak and stared with open eyes at him. "Good evening, Alyona Ivanovna," he began, trying to speak easily, but his voice would not obey him, it broke and shook. "I have come... I have brought something... but we'd better come in... to the light...." And leaving her, he passed straight into the room uninvited. The old woman ran after him; her tongue was unloosed. "Good heavens! What it is? Who is it? What do you want?" "Why, Alyona Ivanovna, you know me... Raskolnikov... here, I brought you the pledge I promised the other day..." and he held out the pledge. The old woman glanced for a moment at the pledge, but at once stared in the eyes of her uninvited visitor. She looked intently, maliciously and mistrustfully. A minute passed; he even fancied something like a sneer in her eyes, as though she had already guessed everything. He felt that he was losing his head, that he was almost frightened, so frightened that if she were to look like that and not say a word for...
2. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part six. Chapter Six
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: the waiters and two little clerks. He was particularly drawn to these clerks by the fact that they both had crooked noses, one bent to the left and the other to the right. They took him finally to a pleasure garden, where he paid for their entrance. There was one lanky three-year-old pine tree and three bushes in the garden, besides a "Vauxhall," which was in reality a drinking-bar where tea too was served, and there were a few green tables and chairs standing round it. A chorus of wretched singers and a drunken, but exceedingly depressed German clown from Munich with a red nose entertained the public. The clerks quarreled with some other clerks and a fight seemed imminent. Svidrigailov was chosen to decide the dispute. He listened to them for a quarter of an hour, but they shouted so loud that there was no possibility of understanding them. The only fact that seemed certain was that one of them had stolen something and had even succeeded in selling it on the spot to a Jew, but would not share the spoil with his companion. Finally it appeared that the stolen object was a teaspoon belonging to the Vauxhall. It was missed and the affair began to seem troublesome. Svidrigailov paid for the spoon, got up, and walked out of the garden. It was about six o'clock. He had not drunk a drop of wine all this time and had ordered tea more for the sake of appearances than anything. It was a dark and stifling evening. Threatening storm-clouds came over the sky about ten o'clock. There was a clap of thunder, and the rain came down like a waterfall. The water fell not in drops, but beat on the earth in streams. There were flashes of lightning every minute and each flash lasted while one could count five. Drenched to the skin, he went home, locked himself in, opened the bureau, took out all his money and tore up two or three papers. Then, putting...
3. Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground (English. Записки из подполья). Part II. Chapter VII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 16кб.
Часть текста: drunk. But if you were anywhere else, living as good people live, I should perhaps be more than attracted by you, should fall in love with you, should be glad of a look from you, let alone a word; I should hang about your door, should go down on my knees to you, should look upon you as my betrothed and think it an honour to be allowed to. I should not dare to have an impure thought about you. But here, you see, I know that I have only to whistle and you have to come with me whether you like it or not. I don't consult your wishes, but you mine. The lowest labourer hires himself as a workman, but he doesn't make a slave of himself altogether; besides, he knows that he will be free again presently. But when are you free? Only think what you are giving up here? What is it you are making a slave of? It is your soul, together with your body; you are selling your soul which you have no right to dispose of! You give your love to be outraged by every drunkard! Love! But that's everything, you know, it's a priceless diamond, it's a maiden's treasure, love--why, a man would be ready to give his soul, to face death to gain that love. But how much is your love worth now? You are sold, all of you, body and soul, and there is no need to strive for love when you can have everything without love. And you know there is no greater insult to a girl than that, do you understand? To be sure, I have heard that they comfort you, poor fools, they let you have lovers of your own here. But you know that's simply a farce, that's simply a sham, it's just laughing at you, and you are taken in by it! Why, do you suppose he really loves you, that lover of...
4. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter VI
Входимость: 1. Размер: 30кб.
Часть текста: that it was really hard to credit the whole business; Mr. Golyadkin was, indeed, ready to admit himself that it was all an incredible delusion, a passing aberration of the fancy, a darkening of the mind, if he had not fortunately known by bitter experience to what lengths spite will sometimes carry any one, what a pitch of ferocity an enemy may reach when he is bent on revenging his honour and prestige. Besides, Mr. Golyadkin's exhausted limbs, his heavy head, his aching back, and the malignant cold in his head bore vivid witness to the probability of his expedition of the previous night and upheld the reality of it, and to some extent of all that had happened during that expedition. And, indeed, Mr. Golyadkin had known long, long before that something was being got up among them, that there was some one else with them. But after all, thinking it over thoroughly, he made up his mind to keep quiet, to submit and not to protest for the time. "They are simply plotting to frighten me, perhaps, and when they see that I don't mind, that I make no protest, but keep perfectly quiet and put up with it meekly, they'll give it up, they'll give it up of themselves, give it up of their own accord." Such, then, were the thoughts...

© 2000- NIV