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823NADA
303NADIE
267NAME
69NAPOLEON
56NARROW
499NASTASIA
126NASTASYA
75NASTY
589NATASHA
133NATURAL
72NATURALEZA
73NATURALLY
172NATURALMENTE
210NATURE
67NATURED
136NEAR
57NEARER
111NEARLY
80NECESARIO
135NECESIDAD
59NECESITO
133NECESSARY
101NECK
279NEED
77NEEDED
52NEGOCIOS
72NEGRO
98NEITHER
234NEL
78NELL
151NELLA
328NELLIE
85NEMMENO
58NEPHEW
53NERVE
89NERVOUS
64NESSUNO
764NEVER
63NEVERTHELESS
413NEW
154NEWS
58NEWSPAPER
257NEXT
102NICE
277NICOLA
149NICOLAIEVNA
227NIENTE
448NIGHT
132NIKOLAEVITCH
250NIKOLAEVNA
645NIKOLAY
190NINA
90NINE
182NINGUN
188NINGUNA
57NINGUNO
193NINO
199NINOS
190NOBLE
67NOBLEZA
65NOBODY
286NOCHE
50NODDED
98NOI
59NOISE
118NOMBRE
2076NON
107NONE
232NONNA
237NONSENSE
216NOR
67NORMAL
480NOS
111NOSE
265NOSOTROS
245NOSTRO
89NOTA
346NOTE
922NOTHING
143NOTICE
172NOTICED
91NOTICIA
85NOTICING
59NOTION
89NOUS
115NOVEL
274NOVIC
1390NOW
79NOWADAYS
229NUESTRA
66NUESTRAS
195NUESTRO
91NUESTROS
116NUEVA
220NUEVO
78NUMBER
187NUMERO
301NUNCA
111NUOVO
60NURSE

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по слову NEGATIVE

1. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part I. Book II. An Unfortunate Gathering. Chapter 6. Why Is Such a Man Alive?
Входимость: 1. Размер: 25кб.
Часть текста: strength. Yet there was something not healthy in his face. It was rather thin, his cheeks were hollow, and there was an unhealthy sallowness in their colour. His rather large, prominent, dark eyes had an expression of firm determination, and yet there was a vague look in them, too. Even when he was excited and talking irritably, his eyes somehow did not follow his mood, but betrayed something else, sometimes quite incongruous with what was passing. "It's hard to tell what he's thinking," those who talked to him sometimes declared. People who saw something pensive and sullen in his eyes were startled by his sudden laugh, which bore witness to mirthful and light-hearted thoughts at the very time when his eyes were so gloomy. A certain strained look in his face was easy to understand at this moment. Everyone knew, or had heard of, the extremely restless and dissipated life which he had been leading of late, as well as of the violent anger to which he had been roused in his quarrels with his father. There were several stories current in the town about it. It is true that he was irascible by nature, "of an unstable and unbalanced mind," as our justice of the peace, Katchalnikov, happily described him. He was stylishly and irreproachably dressed in a carefully buttoned frock-coat. He wore black gloves and carried a top hat. Having only lately left the army, he still had moustaches and no beard. His dark brown hair was cropped short, and combed forward on his temples. He had the long, determined stride of a military man. He stood still for a moment on the threshold, and glancing at the whole party went straight up to the elder, guessing him ...
2. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part three. Chapter Two
Входимость: 1. Размер: 28кб.
Часть текста: not only because he had been drunk, but because he had taken advantage of the young girl's position to abuse her fiance in his stupid jealousy, knowing nothing of their mutual relations and obligations and next to nothing of the man himself. And what right had he to criticise him in that hasty and unguarded manner? Who had asked for his opinion! Was it thinkable that such a creature as Avdotya Romanovna would be marrying an unworthy man for money? So there must be something in him. The lodgings? But after all how could he know the character of the lodgings? He was furnishing a flat... Foo, how despicable it all was! And what justification was it that he was drunk? Such a stupid excuse was even more degrading! In wine is truth, and the truth had all come out, "that is, all the uncleanness of his coarse and envious heart!" And would such a dream ever be permissible to him, Razumihin? What was he beside such a girl- he, the drunken noisy braggart of last night? "Was it possible to imagine so absurd and cynical a juxtaposition?" Razumihin blushed desperately at the very idea and suddenly the recollection forced itself vividly upon him of how he had said last night on the stairs that the landlady would be jealous of Avdotya Romanovna... that was simply intolerable. He brought his fist down heavily on the kitchen stove, hurt his hand and sent one of the bricks flying. "Of course," he muttered to himself a minute later with a feeling of self-abasement, "of course, all these infamies can never be wiped out or smoothed over... and so it's useless even to think of it, and I must go to them in silence and do my duty... in silence, too.... and not ask forgiveness, and say nothing... for all is lost now!" And...
3. Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground (English. Записки из подполья). Part I. Chapter VI
Входимость: 1. Размер: 4кб.
Часть текста: of the best club by right, and should find my occupation in continually respecting myself. I knew a gentleman who prided himself all his life on being a connoisseur of Lafitte. He considered this as his positive virtue, and never doubted himself. He died, not simply with a tranquil, but with a triumphant conscience, and he was quite right, too. Then I should have chosen a career for myself, I should have been a sluggard and a glutton, not a simple one, but, for instance, one with sympathies for everything sublime and beautiful. How do you like that? I have long had visions of it. That "sublime and beautiful" weighs heavily on my mind at forty But that is at forty; then--oh, then it would have been different! I should have found for myself a form of activity in keeping with it, to be precise, drinking to the health of everything "sublime and beautiful." I should have snatched at every opportunity to drop a tear into my glass and then to drain it to all that is "sublime and beautiful." I should then have turned everything into the sublime and the beautiful; in the nastiest, unquestionable trash, I should have sought out the sublime and the beautiful. I should have exuded tears like a wet sponge. An artist, for instance, paints a picture worthy of Gay. At once I drink to the health of the artist who painted the picture worthy of Gay, because I love all that is "sublime and...
4. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter III. The sins of others
Входимость: 1. Размер: 104кб.
Часть текста: know whether he were betrothed or not, and could not find out for a fact, however much he tried. He had not yet seen his future bride, and did not know whether she was to be his bride or not; did not, in fact, know whether there was anything serious in it at all. Varvara Petrovna, for some reason, resolutely refused to admit him to her presence. In answer to one of his first letters to her (and he wrote a great number of them) she begged him plainly to spare her all communications with him for a time, because she was very busy, and having a great deal of the utmost importance to communicate to him she was waiting for a more free moment to do so, and that she would let him know in time when he could come to see her. She declared she would send back his letters unopened, as they were “simple self-indulgence.” I read that letter myself—he showed it me. Yet all this harshness and indefiniteness were nothing compared with his chief anxiety. That anxiety tormented him to the utmost and without ceasing. He grew thin and dispirited through it. It was something of which he was more ashamed than of anything else, and of which he would not on any account speak, even to me; on the contrary, he lied on occasion, and shuffled before me like a little boy; and at the same time he sent for me himself every day, could not stay two hours without me, needing me as much as air or water. Such conduct rather wounded my vanity. I need hardly say that I had long ago privately guessed this great secret of his, and saw through it completely. It was my firmest conviction at the time that the revelation of this secret, this chief anxiety of Stepan Trofimovitch's would not...
5. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part six. Chapter Six
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: singers and the waiters and two little clerks. He was particularly drawn to these clerks by the fact that they both had crooked noses, one bent to the left and the other to the right. They took him finally to a pleasure garden, where he paid for their entrance. There was one lanky three-year-old pine tree and three bushes in the garden, besides a "Vauxhall," which was in reality a drinking-bar where tea too was served, and there were a few green tables and chairs standing round it. A chorus of wretched singers and a drunken, but exceedingly depressed German clown from Munich with a red nose entertained the public. The clerks quarreled with some other clerks and a fight seemed imminent. Svidrigailov was chosen to decide the dispute. He listened to them for a quarter of an hour, but they shouted so loud that there was no possibility of understanding them. The only fact that seemed certain was that one of them had stolen something and had even succeeded in selling it on the spot to a Jew, but would not share the spoil with his companion. Finally it appeared that the stolen object was a teaspoon belonging to the Vauxhall. It was missed and the affair began to seem troublesome. Svidrigailov paid for the spoon, got up, and walked out of the garden. It was about six o'clock. He had not drunk a drop of wine all this time and had ordered tea more for the sake of appearances than...

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