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60OBEY
197OBJECT
79OBJETO
55OBJETOS
61OBLIGADO
47OBLIGATION
62OBLIGED
77OBRA
66OBRAR
37OBSCURE
51OBSERVACION
56OBSERVAR
44OBSERVATION
93OBSERVE
218OBSERVED
78OBSERVO
62OBTAIN
39OBVIOUS
86OBVIOUSLY
86OCASION
163OCCASION
139OCCHI
59OCCUPIED
33OCCUR
75OCCURRED
91OCHO
84OCURRE
104OCURRIDO
71OCURRIO
36ODD
99ODIO
64OFENDIDO
618OFF
64OFFENCE
95OFFEND
152OFFER
37OFFERING
151OFFICE
181OFFICER
136OFFICIAL
76OFICIAL
218OFTEN
53OGGI
147OGNI
163OIDO
63OIGA
88OIR
424OJOS
991OLD
44OLIA
101OLVIDADO
940ONCE
2547ONE
70ONESELF
1566ONLY
295OPEN
210OPENED
57OPENING
89OPENLY
219OPINION
66OPPORTUNITY
33OPPOSED
94OPPOSITE
32OPPRESS
274ORA
85ORDEN
213ORDER
73ORDERED
88ORDINARY
81ORGULLO
56ORGULLOSO
88ORIGINAL
71ORMAI
164ORO
82ORPHAN
54OSCURIDAD
688OTHER
66OTHERWISE
455OTRA
119OTRAS
343OTRO
174OTROS
229OUGHT
1003OUR
86OURSELVES
1875OUT
55OUTBURST
71OUTSIDE
698OVER
65OVERCOAT
67OVERCOME
34OVERLOOK
72OVERWHELM
46OVERWHELMING
35OWE
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567OWN
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117OYE
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1. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part II. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 15кб.
Часть текста: smart dress which she had kept on ever since at evening, she was sweeping the floor. The wood for the stove was piled up in the corner. The table had been scrubbed, the kettle had been cleaned. In a word, Elena was doing the housework. "Listen, Elena," I cried. "Who wants you to sweep the floor? I don't wish it, you're ill. Have you come here to be a drudge for me?" "Who is going to sweep the floor here?" she answered, drawing herself up and looking straight at me. "I'm not ill now." "But I didn't take you to make you work, Elena. You seem to be afraid I shall scold you like Mme. Bubnov for living with me for nothing. And where did you get that horrid broom? I had no broom," I added, looking at her in wonder. "It's my broom. I brought it here myself, I used to sweep the floor here for grandfather too. And the broom's been lying here ever since under the stove." I went back to the other room musing. Perhaps I may have been in error, but it seemed to me that she felt...
2. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part II. Chapter VIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 51кб.
Часть текста: be more accurate--that I had the qualities of a gambler? Even now, at the time of writing this, I still at moments like thinking about play! It sometimes happens that I sit for hours together absorbed in silent calculations about gambling and in dreams of putting down my stake, of the number turning up, and of picking up my winnings. Yes, I have all sorts of "qualities," and my nature is not a tranquil one. At ten o'clock I intended to go to Stebelkov's and I meant to walk. I sent Matvey home as soon as he appeared. While I was drinking my coffee I tried to think over the position. For some reason I felt pleased; a moment's self-analysis made me realize that I was chiefly pleased because I was going that day to the old prince's. But that day was a momentous and startling one in my life, and it began at once with a surprise. At ten o'clock my door was flung wide open, and Tatyana Pavlovna flew in. There was nothing I expected less than a visit from her, and I jumped up in alarm on seeing her. Her face was ferocious, her manner was incoherent, and I daresay if she had been asked she could not have said why she had hastened to me. I may as well say at once, that she had just received a piece of news that had completely overwhelmed her, and she had not recovered from the first shock of it. The news overwhelmed me, too. She stayed, however, only half a minute, or perhaps a minute, but not more. She simply pounced upon me. "So this is what you've been up to!" she said,...
3. Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground (English. Записки из подполья). Part II. Chapter III
Входимость: 2. Размер: 21кб.
Часть текста: my coming. All this disconcerted me: I sat down, feeling rather miserable, and began listening to what they were saying. They were engaged in warm and earnest conversation about a farewell dinner which they wanted to arrange for the next day to a comrade of theirs called Zverkov, an officer in the army, who was going away to a distant province. This Zverkov had been all the time at school with me too. I had begun to hate him particularly in the upper forms. In the lower forms he had simply been a pretty, playful boy whom everybody liked. I had hated him, however, even in the lower forms, just because he was a pretty and playful boy. He was always bad at his lessons and got worse and worse as he went on; however, he left with a good certificate, as he had powerful interests. During his last year at school he came in for an estate of two hundred serfs, and as almost all of us were poor he took up a swaggering tone among us. He was vulgar in the extreme, but at the same time he was a good-natured fellow, even in his swaggering. In spite of superficial, fantastic and sham notions of honour and dignity, all but very few of us positively grovelled before Zverkov, and the more so the more he swaggered. And it was not from any interested motive that they grovelled, but simply because he had been favoured by the gifts of nature. Moreover, it was, as it were, an accepted idea among us that Zverkov was a specialist in regard to tact and the social graces. This last fact particularly infuriated me. I hated the abrupt self-confident tone of his voice, his admiration of his own witticisms, which were often frightfully stupid, though...
4. Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground (English. Записки из подполья). Part II. Chapter X
Входимость: 4. Размер: 12кб.
Часть текста: of an hour later I was rushing up and down the room in frenzied impatience, from minute to minute I went up to the screen and peeped through the crack at Liza. She was sitting on the ground with her head leaning against the bed, and must have been crying. But she did not go away, and that irritated me. This time she understood it all. I had insulted her finally, but... there's no need to describe it. She realised that my outburst of passion had been simply revenge, a fresh humiliation, and that to my earlier, almost causeless hatred was added now a PERSONAL HATRED, born of envy.... Though I do not maintain positively that she understood all this distinctly; but she certainly did fully understand that I was a despicable man, and what was worse, incapable of loving her. I know I shall be told that this is incredible--but it is incredible to be as spiteful and stupid as I was; it may be added that it was strange I should not love her, or at any rate, appreciate her love. Why is it strange? In the first place, by then I was incapable of love, for I repeat, with me loving meant tyrannising and showing my moral superiority. I have never in my life been able to imagine any other sort of love, and have nowadays come to the point of sometimes thinking that love really consists in the right-- freely given by the beloved object--to tyrannise over her. Even in my underground dreams I did not imagine love except as a struggle. I began it always with hatred and ended it with moral subjugation, and afterwards I never knew what to do with the subjugated object. And what is there to wonder at in that, since I had succeeded in so corrupting myself, since I was so out of touch with "real...
5. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter VIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 46кб.
Часть текста: facts stood before him, clear and painful, but his sadness went beyond all that he could remember or imagine; he realized that he was powerless to console himself unaided. Little by little he began to develop the expectation that this day something important, something decisive, was to happen to him. His attack of yesterday had been a slight one. Excepting some little heaviness in the head and pain in the limbs, he did not feel any particular effects. His brain worked all right, though his soul was heavy within him. He rose late, and immediately upon waking remembered all about the previous evening; he also remembered, though not quite so clearly, how, half an hour after his fit, he had been carried home. He soon heard that a messenger from the Epanchins' had already been to inquire after him. At half-past eleven another arrived; and this pleased him. Vera Lebedeff was one of the first to come to see him and offer her services. No sooner did she catch sight of him than she burst into tears; but when he tried to soothe her she began to laugh. He was quite struck by the girl's deep sympathy for him; he seized her hand and kissed it. Vera flushed crimson....

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