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426TABLE
632TAKE
307TAKEN
201TAKING
428TAL
109TALE
723TALK
703TAMBIEN
119TAMPOCO
688TAN
405TANTO
240TARDE
306TATIANA
307TATYANA
118TAVERN
234TEA
316TEAR
872TELL
139TELLING
172TEMPO
261TEN
193TENER
359TENGO
613TENIA
203TENIDO
215TERRIBLE
114TERRIBLY
145TERROR
109TESTA
714THAN
160THANK
9572THAT
929THEIR
1579THEM
181THEMSELVES
2267THERE
145THEREFORE
500THESE
2267THEY
107THIN
825THING
670THINK
220THINKING
145THIRD
120THIRTY
2465THIS
408THOSE
184THOU
1473THOUGH
806THOUGHT
514THOUSAND
604THREE
107THREW
387THROUGH
123THROW
529TIEMPO
496TIENE
116TIENEN
150TIENES
132TIERRA
269TILL
1453TIME
548TODA
381TODAS
398TODAVIA
139TODAY
1871TODO
687TODOS
245TOGETHER
628TOLD
121TOMORROW
159TONE
107TONGUE
194TONO
1164TOO
489TOOK
110TOTSKI
195TOWARDS
407TOWN
141TRA
134TRAS
440TRE
135TREMBLING
185TRIED
517TROFIMOVITCH
137TROUBLE
339TRUE
250TRUTH
133TRY
163TRYING
223TURN
453TURNED
175TURNING
141TUS
118TUTTA
289TUTTI
530TUTTO
233TWENTY
124TWICE
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по слову TREMENDOUS

1. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part IV. Chapter II
Входимость: 1. Размер: 17кб.
Часть текста: Now it is all over, and everything is understood, but to this day I do not know the secrets of that sick, tortured and outraged little heart. I feel that I am digressing, but at this moment I want to think only of Nellie. Strange to say, now that I am lying alone on a hospital bed, abandoned by all whom I loved so fondly and intensely, some trivial incident of that past, often unnoticed at the time and soon forgotten, comes back all at once to my mind and suddenly takes quite a new significance, completing and explaining to me what I had failed to understand till now. For the first four days of her illness, we, the doctor and I, were in great alarm about her, but on the fifth day the doctor took me aside and told me that there was no reason for anxiety and she would certainly recover. This doctor was the one I had known so long, a good-natured and eccentric old bachelor whom I had called in in Nellie's first illness, and who had so impressed her by the huge Stanislav Cross on his breast. "So there's no reason for anxiety," I said, greatly relieved. "No, she'll get well this time, but afterwards she will soon die." "Die! But why?" I cried, overwhelmed at this death sentence. "Yes, she is certain to die very soon. The patient has an organic defect of the heart, and at the slightest unfavourable circumstance she'll be laid up again. She will perhaps get better, but then she'll be ill again and at last she'll die." "Do you mean nothing can be done to save her? Surely that's impossible. " "But it's inevitable. However, with the removal of un- favourable circumstances, with a quiet and easy life with more pleasure in it, the patient might yet be kept from death and there even are cases. . . unexpected. . . strange and exceptional. . . in fact the patient may be saved by a concatenation of favourable conditions, but radically cured - never." "But, good heavens, what's to be done...
2. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Epilogue. Chapter 2.For a Moment the Lie Becomes Truth
Входимость: 1. Размер: 43кб.
Часть текста: with other prisoners, but in a separate little room, the one where Smerdyakov had been. It is true that there was a sentinel at the other end of the corridor, and there was a grating over the window, so that Varvinsky could be at ease about the indulgence he had shown, which was not quite legal, indeed; but he was a kind-hearted and compassionate young man. He knew how hard it would be for a man like Mitya to pass at once so suddenly into the society of robbers and murderers, and that he must get used to it by degrees. The visits of relations and friends were informally sanctioned by the doctor and overseer, and even by the police captain. But only Alyosha and Grushenka had visited Mitya. Rakitin had tried to force his way in twice, but Mitya persistently begged Varvinsky not to admit him. Alyosha found him sitting on his bed in a hospital dressing gown, rather feverish, with a towel, soaked in vinegar and water, on his head. He looked at Alyosha as he came in with an undefined expression, but there was a shade of something like dread discernible in it. He had become terribly preoccupied since the trial; sometimes he would be silent for half an hour together, and seemed to be pondering something heavily and painfully, oblivious of everything about him. If he roused himself from his brooding and began to talk, he always spoke with a kind of abruptness and never of what he really wanted to say. He looked sometimes with a face of suffering at his brother. He seemed to be more at ease with Grushenka than with Alyosha. It is true, he scarcely spoke to her at all, but as soon as she came in, his whole face lighted up with joy. Alyosha sat down beside him on the bed in silence. This time Mitya was waiting for Alyosha in suspense, but he did not dare ask him a question. He felt it almost unthinkable that Katya would consent to come, and at the same time he felt that if she did...
3. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 59кб.
Часть текста: that: my mind was full of Kraft. Not that the thought of him distressed me very greatly, but yet I was shaken to my inmost depths, and so much so that the ordinary human feeling of pleasure at another man's misfortune--at his breaking his leg or covering himself with disgrace, at his losing some one dear to him, and so on--even this ordinary feeling of mean satisfaction was completely eclipsed by another absolutely single- hearted feeling, a feeling of sorrow, of compassion for Kraft--at least I don't know whether it was compassion, but it was a strong and warm-hearted feeling. And I was glad of this too. It's marvellous how many irrelevant ideas can flash through the mind at the very time when one is shattered by some tremendous piece of news, which one would have thought must overpower all other feelings and banish all extraneous thoughts, especially petty ones; yet petty ones, on the contrary, obtrude themselves. I remember, too, that I was gradually overcome by a quite perceptible nervous shudder, which lasted several minutes, in fact all the time I was at home and talking to Versilov. This interview followed under strange and exceptional circumstances. I had mentioned already that we lived in a separate lodge in the courtyard; this...
4. Dostoevsky. The Crocodile (English. Крокодил)
Входимость: 1. Размер: 84кб.
Часть текста: he offered no objection to his wife's irresistible fancy, but was positively aflame with curiosity himself. "A capital idea!" he said, with the utmost satisfaction. "We'll have a look at the crocodile! On the eve of visiting Europe it is as well to acquaint ourselves on the spot with its indigenous inhabitants." And with these words, taking his wife's arm, he set off with her at once for the Arcade. I joined them, as I usually do, being an intimate friend of the family. I have never seen Ivan Matveitch in a more agreeable frame of mind than he was on that memorable morning-how true it is that we know not beforehand the fate that awaits us! On entering the Arcade he was at once full of admiration for the splendours of the building and, when we reached the shop in which the monster lately arrived in Petersburg was being exhibited, he volunteered to pay the quarter-rouble for me to the crocodile owner - a thing which had never happened before. Walking into a little room,...
5. Dostoevsky. The Gambler (English. Игрок). Chapter IV
Входимость: 1. Размер: 13кб.
Часть текста: special purpose. Well, she promised to explain matters, and I departed. There was a tremendous crowd in the gaming-rooms. What an arrogant, greedy crowd it was! I pressed forward towards the middle of the room until I had secured a seat at a croupier's elbow. Then I began to play in timid fashion, venturing only twenty or thirty gulden at a time. Meanwhile, I observed and took notes. It seemed to me that calculation was superfluous, and by no means possessed of the importance which certain other players attached to it, even though they sat with ruled papers in their hands, whereon they set down the coups, calculated the chances, reckoned, staked, and--lost exactly as we more simple mortals did who played without any reckoning at all. However, I deduced from the scene one conclusion which seemed to me reliable --namely, that in the flow of fortuitous chances there is, if not a system, at all events a sort of order. This, of course, is a very strange thing. For instance, after a dozen middle figures there would always occur a dozen or so outer ones. Suppose the ball stopped twice at a dozen outer figures; it would then pass to a dozen of the first ones, and then, again, to a dozen of the middle ciphers, and fall upon them three or four times, and then revert to a dozen outers; whence, after another couple of rounds, the ball would again pass to the first figures, strike upon them once, and then return thrice to the middle series--continuing thus for an hour and a half, or two...

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