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20UBER
15UGH
36UGLY
121ULTIMA
59ULTIMAS
211ULTIMO
12ULTRA
70UMBRAL
25UMBRELLA
4001UNA
112UNABLE
31UNAWARE
11UNBECOMING
25UNCERTAIN
50UNCLE
10UNCONCERNED
72UNCONSCIOUS
220UND
309UNDER
62UNDERGROUND
573UNDERSTAND
83UNDERSTANDING
146UNDERSTOOD
35UNDERTAKE
18UNDERTAKEN
19UNDERTAKING
18UNDERTONE
16UNDERTOOK
53UNDOUBTEDLY
34UNDRESS
110UNE
60UNEASILY
61UNEASINESS
101UNEASY
11UNEDUCATED
10UNENDURABLE
89UNEXPECTED
62UNEXPECTEDLY
12UNEXPECTEDNESS
23UNFOLD
66UNFORTUNATE
139UNHAPPY
68UNICA
149UNICAMENTE
137UNICO
49UNIFORM
9UNIMPORTANT
36UNION
22UNITED
86UNIV
73UNIVERSAL
20UNIVERSE
80UNIVERSITY
73UNKNOWN
11UNLUCKY
11UNMASK
29UNMISTAKABLY
54UNNATURAL
477UNO
245UNOS
72UNPLEASANT
77UNSEEMLY
18UNSEEN
158UNTIL
33UNTO
30UNUSUAL
31UNWELL
51UNWILLING
52UNWORTHY
137UOMO
9UPBRAID
672UPON
46UPPER
15UPRIGHT
26UPROAR
82UPSET
15UPSETTING
11UPSHOT
9UPSIDE
77UPSTAIRS
16UPWARD
14URCHIN
9URGE
26URGENT
184USE
379USED
37USEFUL
46USELESS
9USHER
3093USTED
322USTEDES
117USUAL
59USUALLY
54UTIL
10UTILE
93UTMOST
93UTTER
20UTTERANCE
88UTTERED
146UTTERLY

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по слову UNEASILY

1. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part I. Book II. An Unfortunate Gathering. Chapter 6. Why Is Such a Man Alive?
Входимость: 1. Размер: 25кб.
Часть текста: follow his mood, but betrayed something else, sometimes quite incongruous with what was passing. "It's hard to tell what he's thinking," those who talked to him sometimes declared. People who saw something pensive and sullen in his eyes were startled by his sudden laugh, which bore witness to mirthful and light-hearted thoughts at the very time when his eyes were so gloomy. A certain strained look in his face was easy to understand at this moment. Everyone knew, or had heard of, the extremely restless and dissipated life which he had been leading of late, as well as of the violent anger to which he had been roused in his quarrels with his father. There were several stories current in the town about it. It is true that he was irascible by nature, "of an unstable and unbalanced mind," as our justice of the peace, Katchalnikov, happily described him. He was stylishly and irreproachably dressed in a carefully buttoned frock-coat. He wore black gloves and carried a top hat. Having only lately left the army, he still had moustaches and no beard. His dark brown hair was cropped short, and combed forward on his temples. He had the long, determined stride of a military man. He stood still for a moment on the threshold, and glancing at the whole party went straight up to the elder, guessing him to be their host. He made him a low bow, and asked his blessing. Father Zossima,...
2. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part I. Chapter VII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 6кб.
Часть текста: as I looked at those pale, hollow cheeks, feverishly parched lips, and eyes that gleamed under the long dark lashes with a feverish fire and a sort of passionate determination. But, my God, how lovely she was! Never before, or since, have I seen her as she was on that fatal day. Was it the same, the same Natasha, the same girl who only a year ago had listened to my novel with her eyes fixed on me and her lips following mine, who had so gaily and carelessly laughed and jested with her father and me at supper afterwards; was it the same Natasha who in that very room had said "Yes" to me, hanging her head and flushing all over? We heard the deep note of the bell ringing for vespers. She started. Anna Andreyevna crossed herself. "You're ready for church, Natasha, and they're ringing for the service. Go, Natasha, go and pray. It's a good thing it's so near. And you'll get a walk, too, at the same time. Why sit shut up indoors? See how pale you are, as though you were bewitched."...
3. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part three. Chapter Five
Входимость: 1. Размер: 45кб.
Часть текста: an introduction, bowed to Porfiry Petrovitch, who stood in the middle of the room looking inquiringly at them. He held out his hand and shook hands, still apparently making desperate efforts to subdue his mirth and utter a few words to introduce himself. But he had no sooner succeeded in assuming a serious air and muttering something when he suddenly glanced again as though accidentally at Razumihin, and could no longer control himself: his stifled laughter broke out the more irresistibly the more he tried to restrain it. The extraordinary ferocity with which Razumihin received this "spontaneous" mirth gave the whole scene the appearance of most genuine fun and naturalness. Razumihin strengthened this impression as though on purpose. "Fool! You fiend," he roared, waving his arm which at once struck a little round table with an empty tea-glass on it. Everything was sent flying and crashing. "But why break chairs, gentlemen? You know it's a loss to the Crown," Porfiry Petrovitch quoted gaily. Raskolnikov was still laughing, with his hand in Porfiry Petrovitch's, but anxious not to overdo it, awaited the right moment to put a natural end to it. Razumihin, completely put to confusion by upsetting the table and smashing the glass, gazed gloomily at the fragments, cursed and turned sharply to the window where he stood looking out with his back to the company with a fiercely scowling countenance, seeing nothing. Porfiry Petrovitch laughed and was ready to go on laughing, but obviously looked for explanations. Zametov had been sitting in the corner, but he rose at the visitors' entrance and was standing in expectation with a smile on his lips, though he looked with surprise and even it seemed incredulity at the whole scene and at Raskolnikov with a certain embarrassment. Zametov's unexpected presence struck Raskolnikov unpleasantly. "I've...
4. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part two. Chapter Three
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: unconscious, however, all the time he was ill; he was in a feverish state, sometimes delirious, sometimes half conscious. He remembered a great deal afterwards. Sometimes it seemed as though there were a number of people round him; they wanted to take him away somewhere, there was a great deal of squabbling and discussing about him. Then he would be alone in the room; they had all gone away afraid of him, and only now and then opened the door a crack to look at him; they threatened him, plotted something together, laughed, and mocked at him. He remembered Nastasya often at his bedside; he distinguished another person, too, whom he seemed to know very well, though he could not remember who he was, and this fretted him, even made him cry. Sometimes he fancied he had been lying there a month; at other times it all seemed part of the same day. But of that- of that he had no recollection, and yet every minute he felt that he had forgotten something he ought to remember. He worried and tormented himself trying to remember, moaned, flew into a rage, or sank into awful, intolerable terror. Then he struggled to get up, would have run away, but some one always prevented him by force, and he sank back into impotence and forgetfulness. At last he returned to complete consciousness. It happened at ten o'clock in the morning. On fine days the sun shone into the room at that hour, throwing a streak of light on the right wall and the corner near the door. Nastasya was standing beside him with another person, a complete stranger, who was looking at him very inquisitively. He was a young man with a beard, wearing a full, short-waisted coat, and...
5. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part four. Chapter One
Входимость: 1. Размер: 31кб.
Часть текста: that is interesting and flattering; secondly, I cherish the hope that you may not refuse to assist me in a matter directly concerning the welfare of your sister, Avdotya Romanovna. For without your support she might not let me come near her now, for she is prejudiced against me, but with your assistance I reckon on..." "You reckon wrongly," interrupted Raskolnikov. "They only arrived yesterday, may I ask you?" Raskolnikov made no reply. "It was yesterday, I know. I only arrived myself the day before. Well, let me tell you this, Rodion Romanovitch, I don't consider it necessary to justify myself, but kindly tell me what was there particularly criminal on my part in all this business, speaking without prejudice, with common sense?" Raskolnikov continued to look at him in silence. "That in my own house I persecuted a defenceless girl and 'insulted her with my infamous proposals'- is that it? (I am anticipating you.) But you've only to assume that I, too, am a man et nihil humanum... in a ...

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